The Kyna Diaries

My big, happy family in college.
So much love for the UP Diliman Psychology Class of 2014.
{Photo from Larrenz Ramos}

My big, happy family in college.

So much love for the UP Diliman Psychology Class of 2014.

{Photo from Larrenz Ramos}

Birthday selfie(s). It has been a good day for me. Thanks to everyone who greeted! :> #summervibes

Birthday selfie(s). It has been a good day for me. Thanks to everyone who greeted! :> #summervibes

In another time, it can end up the same.

“For a second his dark eyes are on mine, and he’s quiet. Then he touches my face and leans in close, brushing my lips with his. The river roars and I feel its spray on my ankles. He grins and presses his mouth to mine.I tense up at first, unsure of myself, so when he pulls away, I’m sure I did something wrong, or badly. But he takes my face in his hands, his fingers strong against my skin, and kisses me again, firmer this time, more certain. I wrap an arm around him, sliding my hand up his neck and into his short hair.For a few minutes we kiss, deep in the chasm, with the roar of water all around us. And when we rise, hand in hand, I realize that if we had both chosen differently, we might have ended up doing the same thing, in a safer place, in gray clothes instead of black ones.” ▬Divergent (pg. 338)

In another time, it can end up the same.

“For a second his dark eyes are on mine, and he’s quiet. Then he touches my face and leans in close, brushing my lips with his. The river roars and I feel its spray on my ankles. He grins and presses his mouth to mine.
I tense up at first, unsure of myself, so when he pulls away, I’m sure I did something wrong, or badly. But he takes my face in his hands, his fingers strong against my skin, and kisses me again, firmer this time, more certain. I wrap an arm around him, sliding my hand up his neck and into his short hair.
For a few minutes we kiss, deep in the chasm, with the roar of water all around us. And when we rise, hand in hand, I realize that if we had both chosen differently, we might have ended up doing the same thing, in a safer place, in gray clothes instead of black ones.”Divergent (pg. 338)

(via hiswordssplashedmewithstars)

Katy Perry’s new single Birthday is just in time for my birthday!

Whoa. I’m 21 today. Thank you Lord for the 2 decades and another year in my life :)

see, I’ve been a bad, bad, bad, bad man
and I’m in deep, yes I am
I found a brand new love for this man
and I can’t wait till you see

One of the most badass scenes from last night’s season finale :)

I still ‘ship Donna and Harvey. :) #SuitsFinale

Seniors’ Psycle 2014
EICs: Arla Salcedo and Kaye Alonzo (thank you for an awesome Psycle!)
Thank you so much to PsychSoc for the experiences I had with you in my college life. Looking back, there were so much fun and lessons learned. Because of Psychsoc, I have stories to tell when it comes to working on tasks, producing results, and dealing with different people (they ask these kinds of stuff in job interviews and I’m so glad I have experiences to share). I am so happy to be given a one-page full spread in Psycle one last time.
I know Psychsoc is in good hands as we, seniors, leave UP this year. Keep the IDAFPS burning. I love you POPS! :)

Seniors’ Psycle 2014

EICs: Arla Salcedo and Kaye Alonzo (thank you for an awesome Psycle!)

Thank you so much to PsychSoc for the experiences I had with you in my college life. Looking back, there were so much fun and lessons learned. Because of Psychsoc, I have stories to tell when it comes to working on tasks, producing results, and dealing with different people (they ask these kinds of stuff in job interviews and I’m so glad I have experiences to share). I am so happy to be given a one-page full spread in Psycle one last time.

I know Psychsoc is in good hands as we, seniors, leave UP this year. Keep the IDAFPS burning. I love you POPS! :)


"On the day you are born, you will share it with 17 million other people. During your 10 years in school, you will make, on average, at least 20 good friends. By the time you’re 40, that number will have dropped down to 3. You will grow 950km of hair. You will laugh an average 18 times a day. You will walk the equivalent of 3 times the circumference of the Earth. You will eat 30 tonnes of food, and drink 9,000 cups of coffee or tea. On average, you will spend 15 years of your life at work, 20 years sleeping, 3 years on the toilet, 7 months waiting in traffic, 2 months on hold, and 19 days looking for the TV remote. This leaves you with just one fifth of your life to actually live… So what the hell are you waiting for?”
MAKE EACH DAY COUNT.
Written/submitted by: these-greatexpectations

"On the day you are born, you will share it with 17 million other people. During your 10 years in school, you will make, on average, at least 20 good friends. By the time you’re 40, that number will have dropped down to 3. You will grow 950km of hair. You will laugh an average 18 times a day. You will walk the equivalent of 3 times the circumference of the Earth. You will eat 30 tonnes of food, and drink 9,000 cups of coffee or tea. On average, you will spend 15 years of your life at work, 20 years sleeping, 3 years on the toilet, 7 months waiting in traffic, 2 months on hold, and 19 days looking for the TV remote. This leaves you with just one fifth of your life to actually live… So what the hell are you waiting for?

MAKE EACH DAY COUNT.

Written/submitted by: these-greatexpectations

The fact that you’re struggling doesn’t make you a burden. It doesn’t make you unloveable or undesirable or undeserving of care. It doesn’t make you too much or too sensitive or too needy. It makes you human. Everyone struggles. Everyone has a difficult time coping, and at times, we all fall apart. During these times, we aren’t always easy to be around — and that’s okay. No one is easy to be around one hundred percent of the time. Yes, you may sometimes be unpleasant or difficult. And yes, you may sometimes do or say things that make the people around you feel helpless or sad. But those things aren’t all of who you are and they certainly don’t discount your worth as a human being. The truth is that you can be struggling and still be loved. You can be difficult and still be cared for. You can be less than perfect, and still be deserving of compassion and kindness.

Daniell Koepke

(via youvegotmedreaming)

The Hidden Brain: How Ocean Currents Explain Our Unconscious Social Biases

by 

“Those who travel with the current will always feel they are good swimmers; those who swim against the current may never realize they are better swimmers than they imagine.”

Biases often work in surreptitious ways — they sneak in through the backdoor of our conscience, our good-personhood, and our highest rational convictions, and lodge themselves between us and the world, between our imperfect humanity and our aspirational selves, between who we believe we are and how we behave. Those stealthy inner workings of bias are precisely what NPR science correspondent Shankar Vedantam explores in The Hidden Brain: How Our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars, and Save Our Lives (public library) — a sweeping, eye-opening, uncomfortable yet necessary account of how our imperceptible prejudices sneak past our conscious selves and produce “subtle cognitive errors that lay beneath the rim of awareness,” making our actions stand at odds with our intentions and resulting in everything from financial errors based on misjudging risk to voter manipulation to protracted conflicts between people, nations, and groups.

In the introduction, Vedantam contextualizes why this phenomenon isn’t new but bears greater urgency than ever:

Unconscious biases have always dogged us, but multiple factors made them especially dangerous today. Globalization and technology, and the intersecting faultlines of religious extremism, economic upheaval, demographic change, and mass migration have amplified the effects of hidden biases. Our mental errors once affected only ourselves and those in our vicinity. Today, they affect people in distant lands and generations yet unborn. The flapping butterfly that caused a hurricane halfway around the world was a theoretical construct; today, subtle biases in faraway minds produce real storms in our lives.

Underpinning his exploration isn’t a pointed finger but a compassionate understanding that our flaws make us not bad but human — and give us the opportunity to be better humans. Vedantam puts it beautifully:

Good people are not those who lack flaws, the brave are not those who feel no fear, and the generous are not those who never feel selfish. Extraordinary people are not extraordinary because they are invulnerable to unconscious biases. They are extraordinary because they choose to do something about it.

Read more.

Not A Bad Thing - Justin Timberlake

I AM IN LOVE WITH THIS SONG.

I’ve been listening to this for 2 weeks now, and my heart still flutters whenever I hear it. Even in live, JT’s singing is amaaazing.

Said all I want from you is to see you tomorrow. And every tomorrow, maybe you’ll let me borrow your heart. And is it too much to ask for every Sunday, and while we’re at it, throw in every other day to start.

I know people make promises all the time then they turn right around and break them. When someone cuts your heart open with a knife, and you’re bleeding. But I could be that guy to heal it over time, and I won’t stop until you believe it 'cause baby you’re worth it.

So don’t act like it’s a bad thing to fall in love with me 'cause you might look around and find your dreams come true, with me. Spend all your time and your money just to find out that my love was free. So don’t act like it’s a bad thing to fall in love with me, me. It’s not a bad thing to fall in love with me, me

Now how about I’d be the last voice you hear tonight? And every other night for the rest of the nights that there are. Every morning I just wanna see you staring back at me 'cause I know that’s a good place to start

I know people make promises all the time then they turn right around and break them. When someone cuts your heart open with a knife, and you’re bleeding. Don’t you know that I could be that guy to heal it over time and I won’t stop until you believe it 'cause baby you’re worth it.

So don’t act like it’s a bad thing to fall in love with me 'cause you might look around and find your dreams come true, with me. Spend all your time and your money just to find out that my love was free. So don’t act like it’s a bad thing to fall in love with me, me. It’s not a bad thing to fall in love with me, me. It’s not a bad thing to fall in love with me, me. Not such a bad thing to fall in love with me
(Not such a bad thing to fall in love with me)

No I won’t fill your mind with broken promises and wasted time. And if you fall, you’ll always land right in these arms. These arms of mine.

Don’t act like it’s a bad thing to fall in love with me 'cause you might look around and find your dreams come true, with me. Spend all your time and your money just to find out that my love was free. So don’t act like it’s a bad thing to fall in love with me, me. It’s not a bad thing to fall in love with me, me. Not such a bad thing to fall in love with me.

The Difference Between Doing What You Love And Loving What You Do

By BRIANNA WIEST

Bussiness

Not following your “passion” — not turning it into your career — is not the end of the world. It’s not the end of your potential for happiness and it doesn’t mean you’ve failed.

There seems to be this great, modern schism: follow your passion or follow the logic that tells you making your love of post-modernist literature into a career is probably going to be fruitless. Indeed — because there are many passions that can’t, and won’t, become careers. There often has to be a difference between what we love and what pays the electric bill.

This should not — and does not — affect whether or not you can be happy.

There’s a difference between doing what you love and loving what you do. Doing what you love is taking a passion you have — maybe your only passion, maybe not — and making it lucrative. Selling your paintings, signing a book deal, performing for profit. Some people call this selling out. It’s not. It’s just one of the means to an end. But loving what you do involves taking something else — plucking from the proverbial sea of somethings that you already enjoy doing — working hard on it, creating a professional pathway, seeing it to a lucrative end and being happy because your love for it grows. This is the kind of career that will grow with you.

To many people’s surprise, I’m not someone who does what they love, I just love what I do. I never wanted to be a writer, as I very often mention. I did not work to create a writing career, but writing was something I enjoyed, among many other things I enjoy; but it became something that is lucrative and fun, and as the weeks and months (and now at this point, years) go on, I find that my love for it grows, but doesn’t consume me in the way some of my other passions that I didn’t end up pursuing would have. (My list of “Things I’m Most Grateful For” is essentially made up of things that didn’t work out, for what it’s worth).

But if you would have asked me five years ago if I’d like to be doing this — the answer would be no. Ask me today, and I’d tell you I couldn’t imagine anything else. 

As anybody can tell you — in fact, as I have already — pursuing what you’re passionate about isn’t always the best idea. It takes the thing you most love and makes it just that — work. And not just the kind of work where you put in effort, but the kind of work you find yourself slogging through. It becomes a job. A chore. You become consumed by it because you feel you have a responsibility to be the biggest and best; a natural, ego-driven response to pursuing the thing you most love. But it’s not healthy. And often, it’s not realistic.

There is a middle ground. There comes a point where each one of us has to decide whether or not we realistically have the talent, ability and — most importantly — heart and commitment to pursue a one-in-a-million type of career.

Whether we do or whether we don’t, we have to let go of the idea that we can only be happy when we get to “do what we love” for a living — and start simply loving what we do, whatever it is, and seeing where it takes us. Everyone can be doing something they love for a living. It’s not about what you do, it’s about how you do it. This isn’t about foregoing dreams, this is about allowing yourself to find happiness in whatever your circumstances may be, and on whatever path you choose to changing them.

Some people realize this sooner than others, and those who do end up more successful than not. Steve Jobs didn’t start Apple because he was following his passion, he was just good at programming, and as he did it more and more, he found that his love for it grew as his talent and company did.

When you can stay balanced because you have interests outside of your work space, you aren’t devastated by criticism, don’t find yourself destroyed by a setback, and aren’t emotionally invested to an unhealthy degree, you’ll realize that such can never really be the case when you’re trying to make marketable something that inherently isn’t, or won’t be.

You’ll realize that fame, fortune, attention, whatever it is that comes with wild success for doing what you love, will not make you happier. The only happiness is in the doing.

Batch-love. I’m gonna miss the UPD Psych class of 2014.

We made it! :)

{photos from Juno Tansinco}